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scottish-orca:

Meet the West Coast Community: W08 Aquaruis
Type: Atlantic Orca Type 2
Status: Alive.
Catalogued:
 2004
Estimated Age: Unknown
Range: West of the British Isles from the south Irish Sea to the North outer Hebrides, and the west of Ireland along the Atlantic seaboard.
Pod Member: 8/10

About:
Aquarius is an adult male killer whale who was first catalogued in 2004 and has been seen since then in 2009 and 2012 by the HWDT. He is the only one of the five males catalogued that actually has a pretty normal dorsal fin. 

Photos
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coffeeandkudzu:

stumpytheorca:

foundinthesea:

seaworldcares:

Learn more about the amazing story of JJ the California grey whale by watching this video!

This ain’t a video

Can honestly say in that segment I learnt nothing about JJ. 

SeaWorld really needs to stop opening their PR videos with “Well, *I* had this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to work with these animals.” Captivity as being more for human gratification than for the animals’ well being is one of the central criticisms of SeaWorld. The dialogue in these videos just reinforces everything that’s wrong with the positive message they’re attempting to send. Also, lol at the title: I’ve never seen a company so hellbent on taking credit for rescues and rehabilitations than SeaWorld. 

I also have a serious issue with how pervasively SeaWorld frames its rescue/rehab program as a learning experience for the humans involved. I can only assume that it’s part of SeaWorld’s argument that it contributes to scientific scholarship, which is questionable at best and ridiculous at worst—only marine parks care about AI techniques, SeaWorld. No one else does. For rescue and rehab, the number one focus should always be about the well-being of those particular animals, not how humans can expand their own knowledge about them. I know that study and research is important in the long run, but I also doubt the validity of any sort of quantifiable data gleaned from a stressed and ill animal. It’s about the same as the ~respiratory rates, etc~ of captive cetaceans: practically useless for anywhere outside of the captivity context. 

Let’s also remember that JJ was in captivity for 14 months and released, and SeaWorld hailed it as a success, not seeming to be worried about any sort of conditioning that her body may have undergone while in captivity, or any viruses she may have picked up, or how ill she may have become when returning to the wild. Given that these are the common concerns about returning orcas to the wild, the Whale and Dolphin Conservation Network has called SeaWorld’s pride over releasing JJ “ironic.” Also, her tracking tag fell off after 3 days, and I haven’t been able to find any information on affirmative sightings after her release.

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